aboutsummaryrefslogtreecommitdiffstatshomepage
path: root/drivers/net/wireguard (unfollow)
AgeCommit message (Collapse)AuthorFilesLines
13 dayswireguard: netlink: avoid variable-sized memcpy on sockaddrHEADstableJason A. Donenfeld1-7/+6
Doing a variable-sized memcpy is slower, and the compiler isn't smart enough to turn this into a constant-size assignment. Further, Kees' latest fortified memcpy will actually bark, because the destination pointer is type sockaddr, not explicitly sockaddr_in or sockaddr_in6, so it thinks there's an overflow: memcpy: detected field-spanning write (size 28) of single field "&endpoint.addr" at drivers/net/wireguard/netlink.c:446 (size 16) Fix this by just assigning by using explicit casts for each checked case. Cc: Kees Cook <keescook@chromium.org> Fixes: e7096c131e51 ("net: WireGuard secure network tunnel") Signed-off-by: Jason A. Donenfeld <Jason@zx2c4.com>
13 dayswireguard: ratelimiter: disable timings test by defaultJason A. Donenfeld1-15/+10
A previous commit tried to make the ratelimiter timings test more reliable but in the process made it less reliable on other configurations. This is an impossible problem to solve without increasingly ridiculous heuristics. And it's not even a problem that actually needs to be solved in any comprehensive way, since this is only ever used during development. So just cordon this off with a DEBUG_ ifdef, just like we do for the trie's randomized tests, so it can be enabled while hacking on the code, and otherwise disabled in CI. In the process we also revert 151c8e499f47. Fixes: 151c8e499f47 ("wireguard: ratelimiter: use hrtimer in selftest") Fixes: e7096c131e51 ("net: WireGuard secure network tunnel") Signed-off-by: Jason A. Donenfeld <Jason@zx2c4.com>
2022-08-02wireguard: allowedips: don't corrupt stack when detecting overflowJason A. Donenfeld2-6/+9
In case push_rcu() and related functions are buggy, there's a WARN_ON(len >= 128), which the selftest tries to hit by being tricky. In case it is hit, we shouldn't corrupt the kernel's stack, though; otherwise it may be hard to even receive the report that it's buggy. So conditionalize the stack write based on that WARN_ON()'s return value. Note that this never *actually* happens anyway. The WARN_ON() in the first place is bounded by IS_ENABLED(DEBUG), and isn't expected to ever actually hit. This is just a debugging sanity check. Additionally, hoist the constant 128 into a named enum, MAX_ALLOWEDIPS_BITS, so that it's clear why this value is chosen. Suggested-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org> Link: https://lore.kernel.org/all/CAHk-=wjJZGA6w_DxA+k7Ejbqsq+uGK==koPai3sqdsfJqemvag@mail.gmail.com/ Fixes: e7096c131e51 ("net: WireGuard secure network tunnel") Signed-off-by: Jason A. Donenfeld <Jason@zx2c4.com> Signed-off-by: Jakub Kicinski <kuba@kernel.org>
2022-08-02wireguard: ratelimiter: use hrtimer in selftestJason A. Donenfeld1-11/+14
Using msleep() is problematic because it's compared against ratelimiter.c's ktime_get_coarse_boottime_ns(), which means on systems with slow jiffies (such as UML's forced HZ=100), the result is inaccurate. So switch to using schedule_hrtimeout(). However, hrtimer gives us access only to the traditional posix timers, and none of the _COARSE variants. So now, rather than being too imprecise like jiffies, it's too precise. One solution would be to give it a large "range" value, but this will still fire early on a loaded system. A better solution is to align the timeout to the actual coarse timer, and then round up to the nearest tick, plus change. So add the timeout to the current coarse time, and then schedule_hrtimer() until the absolute computed time. This should hopefully reduce flakes in CI as well. Note that we keep the retry loop in case the entire function is running behind, because the test could still be scheduled out, by either the kernel or by the hypervisor's kernel, in which case restarting the test and hoping to not be scheduled out still helps. Fixes: e7096c131e51 ("net: WireGuard secure network tunnel") Suggested-by: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de> Signed-off-by: Jason A. Donenfeld <Jason@zx2c4.com> Signed-off-by: Jakub Kicinski <kuba@kernel.org>
2022-07-01pm/sleep: Add PM_USERSPACE_AUTOSLEEP KconfigKalesh Singh1-1/+2
Systems that initiate frequent suspend/resume from userspace can make the kernel aware by enabling PM_USERSPACE_AUTOSLEEP config. This allows for certain sleep-sensitive code (wireguard/rng) to decide on what preparatory work should be performed (or not) in their pm_notification callbacks. This patch was prompted by the discussion at [1] which attempts to remove CONFIG_ANDROID that currently guards these code paths. [1] https://lore.kernel.org/r/20220629150102.1582425-1-hch@lst.de/ Suggested-by: Jason A. Donenfeld <Jason@zx2c4.com> Acked-by: Jason A. Donenfeld <Jason@zx2c4.com> Signed-off-by: Kalesh Singh <kaleshsingh@google.com> Link: https://lore.kernel.org/r/20220630191230.235306-1-kaleshsingh@google.com Signed-off-by: Greg Kroah-Hartman <gregkh@linuxfoundation.org>
2022-06-09wireguard: receive: use dev_sw_netstats_rx_add()Eric Dumazet1-8/+1
We have a convenient helper, let's use it. This will make the following patch easier to review and smaller. Signed-off-by: Eric Dumazet <edumazet@google.com> Reviewed-by: Jason A. Donenfeld <Jason@zx2c4.com> Signed-off-by: Jakub Kicinski <kuba@kernel.org>
2022-04-22wireguard: device: check for metadata_dst with skb_valid_dst()Nikolay Aleksandrov1-1/+2
When we try to transmit an skb with md_dst attached through wireguard we hit a null pointer dereference in wg_xmit() due to the use of dst_mtu() which calls into dst_blackhole_mtu() which in turn tries to dereference dst->dev. Since wireguard doesn't use md_dsts we should use skb_valid_dst(), which checks for DST_METADATA flag, and if it's set, then falls back to wireguard's device mtu. That gives us the best chance of transmitting the packet; otherwise if the blackhole netdev is used we'd get ETH_MIN_MTU. [ 263.693506] BUG: kernel NULL pointer dereference, address: 00000000000000e0 [ 263.693908] #PF: supervisor read access in kernel mode [ 263.694174] #PF: error_code(0x0000) - not-present page [ 263.694424] PGD 0 P4D 0 [ 263.694653] Oops: 0000 [#1] PREEMPT SMP NOPTI [ 263.694876] CPU: 5 PID: 951 Comm: mausezahn Kdump: loaded Not tainted 5.18.0-rc1+ #522 [ 263.695190] Hardware name: QEMU Standard PC (i440FX + PIIX, 1996), BIOS 1.15.0-1.fc35 04/01/2014 [ 263.695529] RIP: 0010:dst_blackhole_mtu+0x17/0x20 [ 263.695770] Code: 00 00 00 0f 1f 44 00 00 c3 66 2e 0f 1f 84 00 00 00 00 00 0f 1f 44 00 00 48 8b 47 10 48 83 e0 fc 8b 40 04 85 c0 75 09 48 8b 07 <8b> 80 e0 00 00 00 c3 66 90 0f 1f 44 00 00 48 89 d7 be 01 00 00 00 [ 263.696339] RSP: 0018:ffffa4a4422fbb28 EFLAGS: 00010246 [ 263.696600] RAX: 0000000000000000 RBX: ffff8ac9c3553000 RCX: 0000000000000000 [ 263.696891] RDX: 0000000000000401 RSI: 00000000fffffe01 RDI: ffffc4a43fb48900 [ 263.697178] RBP: ffffa4a4422fbb90 R08: ffffffff9622635e R09: 0000000000000002 [ 263.697469] R10: ffffffff9b69a6c0 R11: ffffa4a4422fbd0c R12: ffff8ac9d18b1a00 [ 263.697766] R13: ffff8ac9d0ce1840 R14: ffff8ac9d18b1a00 R15: ffff8ac9c3553000 [ 263.698054] FS: 00007f3704c337c0(0000) GS:ffff8acaebf40000(0000) knlGS:0000000000000000 [ 263.698470] CS: 0010 DS: 0000 ES: 0000 CR0: 0000000080050033 [ 263.698826] CR2: 00000000000000e0 CR3: 0000000117a5c000 CR4: 00000000000006e0 [ 263.699214] Call Trace: [ 263.699505] <TASK> [ 263.699759] wg_xmit+0x411/0x450 [ 263.700059] ? bpf_skb_set_tunnel_key+0x46/0x2d0 [ 263.700382] ? dev_queue_xmit_nit+0x31/0x2b0 [ 263.700719] dev_hard_start_xmit+0xd9/0x220 [ 263.701047] __dev_queue_xmit+0x8b9/0xd30 [ 263.701344] __bpf_redirect+0x1a4/0x380 [ 263.701664] __dev_queue_xmit+0x83b/0xd30 [ 263.701961] ? packet_parse_headers+0xb4/0xf0 [ 263.702275] packet_sendmsg+0x9a8/0x16a0 [ 263.702596] ? _raw_spin_unlock_irqrestore+0x23/0x40 [ 263.702933] sock_sendmsg+0x5e/0x60 [ 263.703239] __sys_sendto+0xf0/0x160 [ 263.703549] __x64_sys_sendto+0x20/0x30 [ 263.703853] do_syscall_64+0x3b/0x90 [ 263.704162] entry_SYSCALL_64_after_hwframe+0x44/0xae [ 263.704494] RIP: 0033:0x7f3704d50506 [ 263.704789] Code: 48 c7 c0 ff ff ff ff eb b7 66 2e 0f 1f 84 00 00 00 00 00 90 41 89 ca 64 8b 04 25 18 00 00 00 85 c0 75 11 b8 2c 00 00 00 0f 05 <48> 3d 00 f0 ff ff 77 72 c3 90 55 48 83 ec 30 44 89 4c 24 2c 4c 89 [ 263.705652] RSP: 002b:00007ffe954b0b88 EFLAGS: 00000246 ORIG_RAX: 000000000000002c [ 263.706141] RAX: ffffffffffffffda RBX: 0000558bb259b490 RCX: 00007f3704d50506 [ 263.706544] RDX: 000000000000004a RSI: 0000558bb259b7b2 RDI: 0000000000000003 [ 263.706952] RBP: 0000000000000000 R08: 00007ffe954b0b90 R09: 0000000000000014 [ 263.707339] R10: 0000000000000000 R11: 0000000000000246 R12: 00007ffe954b0b90 [ 263.707735] R13: 000000000000004a R14: 0000558bb259b7b2 R15: 0000000000000001 [ 263.708132] </TASK> [ 263.708398] Modules linked in: bridge netconsole bonding [last unloaded: bridge] [ 263.708942] CR2: 00000000000000e0 Fixes: e7096c131e51 ("net: WireGuard secure network tunnel") Link: https://github.com/cilium/cilium/issues/19428 Reported-by: Martynas Pumputis <m@lambda.lt> Signed-off-by: Nikolay Aleksandrov <razor@blackwall.org> Acked-by: Daniel Borkmann <daniel@iogearbox.net> Signed-off-by: Jason A. Donenfeld <Jason@zx2c4.com> Signed-off-by: Jakub Kicinski <kuba@kernel.org>
2022-03-30wireguard: socket: ignore v6 endpoints when ipv6 is disabledJason A. Donenfeld1-2/+2
The previous commit fixed a memory leak on the send path in the event that IPv6 is disabled at compile time, but how did a packet even arrive there to begin with? It turns out we have previously allowed IPv6 endpoints even when IPv6 support is disabled at compile time. This is awkward and inconsistent. Instead, let's just ignore all things IPv6, the same way we do other malformed endpoints, in the case where IPv6 is disabled. Fixes: e7096c131e51 ("net: WireGuard secure network tunnel") Signed-off-by: Jason A. Donenfeld <Jason@zx2c4.com> Signed-off-by: Jakub Kicinski <kuba@kernel.org>
2022-03-30wireguard: socket: free skb in send6 when ipv6 is disabledWang Hai1-0/+1
I got a memory leak report: unreferenced object 0xffff8881191fc040 (size 232): comm "kworker/u17:0", pid 23193, jiffies 4295238848 (age 3464.870s) hex dump (first 32 bytes): 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 ................ 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 ................ backtrace: [<ffffffff814c3ef4>] slab_post_alloc_hook+0x84/0x3b0 [<ffffffff814c8977>] kmem_cache_alloc_node+0x167/0x340 [<ffffffff832974fb>] __alloc_skb+0x1db/0x200 [<ffffffff82612b5d>] wg_socket_send_buffer_to_peer+0x3d/0xc0 [<ffffffff8260e94a>] wg_packet_send_handshake_initiation+0xfa/0x110 [<ffffffff8260ec81>] wg_packet_handshake_send_worker+0x21/0x30 [<ffffffff8119c558>] process_one_work+0x2e8/0x770 [<ffffffff8119ca2a>] worker_thread+0x4a/0x4b0 [<ffffffff811a88e0>] kthread+0x120/0x160 [<ffffffff8100242f>] ret_from_fork+0x1f/0x30 In function wg_socket_send_buffer_as_reply_to_skb() or wg_socket_send_ buffer_to_peer(), the semantics of send6() is required to free skb. But when CONFIG_IPV6 is disable, kfree_skb() is missing. This patch adds it to fix this bug. Signed-off-by: Wang Hai <wanghai38@huawei.com> Fixes: e7096c131e51 ("net: WireGuard secure network tunnel") Signed-off-by: Jason A. Donenfeld <Jason@zx2c4.com> Signed-off-by: Jakub Kicinski <kuba@kernel.org>
2022-03-30wireguard: queueing: use CFI-safe ptr_ring cleanup functionJason A. Donenfeld1-1/+2
We make too nuanced use of ptr_ring to entirely move to the skb_array wrappers, but we at least should avoid the naughty function pointer cast when cleaning up skbs. Otherwise RAP/CFI will honk at us. This patch uses the __skb_array_destroy_skb wrapper for the cleanup, rather than directly providing kfree_skb, which is what other drivers in the same situation do too. Reported-by: PaX Team <pageexec@freemail.hu> Fixes: 886fcee939ad ("wireguard: receive: use ring buffer for incoming handshakes") Signed-off-by: Jason A. Donenfeld <Jason@zx2c4.com> Signed-off-by: Jakub Kicinski <kuba@kernel.org>
2022-03-12wireguard: device: clear keys on VM forkJason A. Donenfeld1-11/+27
When a virtual machine forks, it's important that WireGuard clear existing sessions so that different plaintexts are not transmitted using the same key+nonce, which can result in catastrophic cryptographic failure. To accomplish this, we simply hook into the newly added vmfork notifier. As a bonus, it turns out that, like the vmfork registration function, the PM registration function is stubbed out when CONFIG_PM_SLEEP is not set, so we can actually just remove the maze of ifdefs, which makes it really quite clean to support both notifiers at once. Cc: Dominik Brodowski <linux@dominikbrodowski.net> Cc: Greg Kroah-Hartman <gregkh@linuxfoundation.org> Cc: Theodore Ts'o <tytso@mit.edu> Acked-by: Jakub Kicinski <kuba@kernel.org> Signed-off-by: Jason A. Donenfeld <Jason@zx2c4.com>
2022-01-18lib/crypto: blake2s: move hmac construction into wireguardJason A. Donenfeld1-6/+39
Basically nobody should use blake2s in an HMAC construction; it already has a keyed variant. But unfortunately for historical reasons, Noise, used by WireGuard, uses HKDF quite strictly, which means we have to use this. Because this really shouldn't be used by others, this commit moves it into wireguard's noise.c locally, so that kernels that aren't using WireGuard don't get this superfluous code baked in. On m68k systems, this shaves off ~314 bytes. Cc: Herbert Xu <herbert@gondor.apana.org.au> Tested-by: Geert Uytterhoeven <geert@linux-m68k.org> Acked-by: Ard Biesheuvel <ardb@kernel.org> Signed-off-by: Jason A. Donenfeld <Jason@zx2c4.com>
2021-11-29wireguard: ratelimiter: use kvcalloc() instead of kvzalloc()Gustavo A. R. Silva1-2/+2
Use 2-factor argument form kvcalloc() instead of kvzalloc(). Link: https://github.com/KSPP/linux/issues/162 Fixes: e7096c131e51 ("net: WireGuard secure network tunnel") Signed-off-by: Gustavo A. R. Silva <gustavoars@kernel.org> [Jason: Gustavo's link above is for KSPP, but this isn't actually a security fix, as table_size is bounded to 8192 anyway, and gcc realizes this, so the codegen comes out to be about the same.] Signed-off-by: Jason A. Donenfeld <Jason@zx2c4.com> Signed-off-by: Jakub Kicinski <kuba@kernel.org>
2021-11-29wireguard: receive: drop handshakes if queue lock is contendedJason A. Donenfeld1-3/+13
If we're being delivered packets from multiple CPUs so quickly that the ring lock is contended for CPU tries, then it's safe to assume that the queue is near capacity anyway, so just drop the packet rather than spinning. This helps deal with multicore DoS that can interfere with data path performance. It _still_ does not completely fix the issue, but it again chips away at it. Reported-by: Streun Fabio <fstreun@student.ethz.ch> Fixes: e7096c131e51 ("net: WireGuard secure network tunnel") Signed-off-by: Jason A. Donenfeld <Jason@zx2c4.com> Signed-off-by: Jakub Kicinski <kuba@kernel.org>
2021-11-29wireguard: receive: use ring buffer for incoming handshakesJason A. Donenfeld5-43/+37
Apparently the spinlock on incoming_handshake's skb_queue is highly contended, and a torrent of handshake or cookie packets can bring the data plane to its knees, simply by virtue of enqueueing the handshake packets to be processed asynchronously. So, we try switching this to a ring buffer to hopefully have less lock contention. This alleviates the problem somewhat, though it still isn't perfect, so future patches will have to improve this further. However, it at least doesn't completely diminish the data plane. Reported-by: Streun Fabio <fstreun@student.ethz.ch> Reported-by: Joel Wanner <joel.wanner@inf.ethz.ch> Fixes: e7096c131e51 ("net: WireGuard secure network tunnel") Signed-off-by: Jason A. Donenfeld <Jason@zx2c4.com> Signed-off-by: Jakub Kicinski <kuba@kernel.org>
2021-11-29wireguard: device: reset peer src endpoint when netns exitsJason A. Donenfeld2-1/+4
Each peer's endpoint contains a dst_cache entry that takes a reference to another netdev. When the containing namespace exits, we take down the socket and prevent future sockets from being created (by setting creating_net to NULL), which removes that potential reference on the netns. However, it doesn't release references to the netns that a netdev cached in dst_cache might be taking, so the netns still might fail to exit. Since the socket is gimped anyway, we can simply clear all the dst_caches (by way of clearing the endpoint src), which will release all references. However, the current dst_cache_reset function only releases those references lazily. But it turns out that all of our usages of wg_socket_clear_peer_endpoint_src are called from contexts that are not exactly high-speed or bottle-necked. For example, when there's connection difficulty, or when userspace is reconfiguring the interface. And in particular for this patch, when the netns is exiting. So for those cases, it makes more sense to call dst_release immediately. For that, we add a small helper function to dst_cache. This patch also adds a test to netns.sh from Hangbin Liu to ensure this doesn't regress. Tested-by: Hangbin Liu <liuhangbin@gmail.com> Reported-by: Xiumei Mu <xmu@redhat.com> Cc: Toke Høiland-Jørgensen <toke@redhat.com> Cc: Paolo Abeni <pabeni@redhat.com> Fixes: 900575aa33a3 ("wireguard: device: avoid circular netns references") Signed-off-by: Jason A. Donenfeld <Jason@zx2c4.com> Signed-off-by: Jakub Kicinski <kuba@kernel.org>
2021-11-29wireguard: main: rename 'mod_init' & 'mod_exit' functions to be module-specificRandy Dunlap1-4/+4
Rename module_init & module_exit functions that are named "mod_init" and "mod_exit" so that they are unique in both the System.map file and in initcall_debug output instead of showing up as almost anonymous "mod_init". This is helpful for debugging and in determining how long certain module_init calls take to execute. Signed-off-by: Randy Dunlap <rdunlap@infradead.org> Signed-off-by: Jason A. Donenfeld <Jason@zx2c4.com> Signed-off-by: Jakub Kicinski <kuba@kernel.org>
2021-11-29wireguard: allowedips: add missing __rcu annotation to satisfy sparseJason A. Donenfeld1-1/+1
A __rcu annotation got lost during refactoring, which caused sparse to become enraged. Fixes: bf7b042dc62a ("wireguard: allowedips: free empty intermediate nodes when removing single node") Signed-off-by: Jason A. Donenfeld <Jason@zx2c4.com> Signed-off-by: Jakub Kicinski <kuba@kernel.org>
2021-11-22skbuff: Switch structure bounds to struct_group()Kees Cook1-3/+1
In preparation for FORTIFY_SOURCE performing compile-time and run-time field bounds checking for memcpy(), memmove(), and memset(), avoid intentionally writing across neighboring fields. Replace the existing empty member position markers "headers_start" and "headers_end" with a struct_group(). This will allow memcpy() and sizeof() to more easily reason about sizes, and improve readability. "pahole" shows no size nor member offset changes to struct sk_buff. "objdump -d" shows no object code changes (outside of WARNs affected by source line number changes). Signed-off-by: Kees Cook <keescook@chromium.org> Reviewed-by: Gustavo A. R. Silva <gustavoars@kernel.org> Reviewed-by: Jason A. Donenfeld <Jason@zx2c4.com> # drivers/net/wireguard/* Link: https://lore.kernel.org/lkml/20210728035006.GD35706@embeddedor Signed-off-by: David S. Miller <davem@davemloft.net>
2021-06-04wireguard: allowedips: free empty intermediate nodes when removing single nodeJason A. Donenfeld3-131/+137
When removing single nodes, it's possible that that node's parent is an empty intermediate node, in which case, it too should be removed. Otherwise the trie fills up and never is fully emptied, leading to gradual memory leaks over time for tries that are modified often. There was originally code to do this, but was removed during refactoring in 2016 and never reworked. Now that we have proper parent pointers from the previous commits, we can implement this properly. In order to reduce branching and expensive comparisons, we want to keep the double pointer for parent assignment (which lets us easily chain up to the root), but we still need to actually get the parent's base address. So encode the bit number into the last two bits of the pointer, and pack and unpack it as needed. This is a little bit clumsy but is the fastest and less memory wasteful of the compromises. Note that we align the root struct here to a minimum of 4, because it's embedded into a larger struct, and we're relying on having the bottom two bits for our flag, which would only be 16-bit aligned on m68k. The existing macro-based helpers were a bit unwieldy for adding the bit packing to, so this commit replaces them with safer and clearer ordinary functions. We add a test to the randomized/fuzzer part of the selftests, to free the randomized tries by-peer, refuzz it, and repeat, until it's supposed to be empty, and then then see if that actually resulted in the whole thing being emptied. That combined with kmemcheck should hopefully make sure this commit is doing what it should. Along the way this resulted in various other cleanups of the tests and fixes for recent graphviz. Fixes: e7096c131e51 ("net: WireGuard secure network tunnel") Cc: stable@vger.kernel.org Signed-off-by: Jason A. Donenfeld <Jason@zx2c4.com> Signed-off-by: David S. Miller <davem@davemloft.net>
2021-06-04wireguard: allowedips: allocate nodes in kmem_cacheJason A. Donenfeld3-8/+38
The previous commit moved from O(n) to O(1) for removal, but in the process introduced an additional pointer member to a struct that increased the size from 60 to 68 bytes, putting nodes in the 128-byte slab. With deployed systems having as many as 2 million nodes, this represents a significant doubling in memory usage (128 MiB -> 256 MiB). Fix this by using our own kmem_cache, that's sized exactly right. This also makes wireguard's memory usage more transparent in tools like slabtop and /proc/slabinfo. Fixes: e7096c131e51 ("net: WireGuard secure network tunnel") Suggested-by: Arnd Bergmann <arnd@arndb.de> Suggested-by: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org> Cc: stable@vger.kernel.org Signed-off-by: Jason A. Donenfeld <Jason@zx2c4.com> Signed-off-by: David S. Miller <davem@davemloft.net>
2021-06-04wireguard: allowedips: remove nodes in O(1)Jason A. Donenfeld2-84/+57
Previously, deleting peers would require traversing the entire trie in order to rebalance nodes and safely free them. This meant that removing 1000 peers from a trie with a half million nodes would take an extremely long time, during which we're holding the rtnl lock. Large-scale users were reporting 200ms latencies added to the networking stack as a whole every time their userspace software would queue up significant removals. That's a serious situation. This commit fixes that by maintaining a double pointer to the parent's bit pointer for each node, and then using the already existing node list belonging to each peer to go directly to the node, fix up its pointers, and free it with RCU. This means removal is O(1) instead of O(n), and we don't use gobs of stack. The removal algorithm has the same downside as the code that it fixes: it won't collapse needlessly long runs of fillers. We can enhance that in the future if it ever becomes a problem. This commit documents that limitation with a TODO comment in code, a small but meaningful improvement over the prior situation. Currently the biggest flaw, which the next commit addresses, is that because this increases the node size on 64-bit machines from 60 bytes to 68 bytes. 60 rounds up to 64, but 68 rounds up to 128. So we wind up using twice as much memory per node, because of power-of-two allocations, which is a big bummer. We'll need to figure something out there. Fixes: e7096c131e51 ("net: WireGuard secure network tunnel") Cc: stable@vger.kernel.org Signed-off-by: Jason A. Donenfeld <Jason@zx2c4.com> Signed-off-by: David S. Miller <davem@davemloft.net>
2021-06-04wireguard: allowedips: initialize list head in selftestJason A. Donenfeld1-1/+2
The randomized trie tests weren't initializing the dummy peer list head, resulting in a NULL pointer dereference when used. Fix this by initializing it in the randomized trie test, just like we do for the static unit test. While we're at it, all of the other strings like this have the word "self-test", so add it to the missing place here. Fixes: e7096c131e51 ("net: WireGuard secure network tunnel") Cc: stable@vger.kernel.org Signed-off-by: Jason A. Donenfeld <Jason@zx2c4.com> Signed-off-by: David S. Miller <davem@davemloft.net>
2021-06-04wireguard: peer: allocate in kmem_cacheJason A. Donenfeld3-4/+27
With deployments having upwards of 600k peers now, this somewhat heavy structure could benefit from more fine-grained allocations. Specifically, instead of using a 2048-byte slab for a 1544-byte object, we can now use 1544-byte objects directly, thus saving almost 25% per-peer, or with 600k peers, that's a savings of 303 MiB. This also makes wireguard's memory usage more transparent in tools like slabtop and /proc/slabinfo. Fixes: 8b5553ace83c ("wireguard: queueing: get rid of per-peer ring buffers") Suggested-by: Arnd Bergmann <arnd@arndb.de> Suggested-by: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org> Cc: stable@vger.kernel.org Signed-off-by: Jason A. Donenfeld <Jason@zx2c4.com> Signed-off-by: David S. Miller <davem@davemloft.net>
2021-06-04wireguard: use synchronize_net rather than synchronize_rcuJason A. Donenfeld2-4/+4
Many of the synchronization points are sometimes called under the rtnl lock, which means we should use synchronize_net rather than synchronize_rcu. Under the hood, this expands to using the expedited flavor of function in the event that rtnl is held, in order to not stall other concurrent changes. This fixes some very, very long delays when removing multiple peers at once, which would cause some operations to take several minutes. Fixes: e7096c131e51 ("net: WireGuard secure network tunnel") Cc: stable@vger.kernel.org Signed-off-by: Jason A. Donenfeld <Jason@zx2c4.com> Signed-off-by: David S. Miller <davem@davemloft.net>
2021-06-04wireguard: do not use -O3Jason A. Donenfeld1-2/+1
Apparently, various versions of gcc have O3-related miscompiles. Looking at the difference between -O2 and -O3 for gcc 11 doesn't indicate miscompiles, but the difference also doesn't seem so significant for performance that it's worth risking. Link: https://lore.kernel.org/lkml/CAHk-=wjuoGyxDhAF8SsrTkN0-YfCx7E6jUN3ikC_tn2AKWTTsA@mail.gmail.com/ Link: https://lore.kernel.org/lkml/CAHmME9otB5Wwxp7H8bR_i2uH2esEMvoBMC8uEXBMH9p0q1s6Bw@mail.gmail.com/ Reported-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org> Fixes: e7096c131e51 ("net: WireGuard secure network tunnel") Cc: stable@vger.kernel.org Signed-off-by: Jason A. Donenfeld <Jason@zx2c4.com> Signed-off-by: David S. Miller <davem@davemloft.net>
2021-02-23wireguard: queueing: get rid of per-peer ring buffersJason A. Donenfeld8-93/+144
Having two ring buffers per-peer means that every peer results in two massive ring allocations. On an 8-core x86_64 machine, this commit reduces the per-peer allocation from 18,688 bytes to 1,856 bytes, which is an 90% reduction. Ninety percent! With some single-machine deployments approaching 500,000 peers, we're talking about a reduction from 7 gigs of memory down to 700 megs of memory. In order to get rid of these per-peer allocations, this commit switches to using a list-based queueing approach. Currently GSO fragments are chained together using the skb->next pointer (the skb_list_* singly linked list approach), so we form the per-peer queue around the unused skb->prev pointer (which sort of makes sense because the links are pointing backwards). Use of skb_queue_* is not possible here, because that is based on doubly linked lists and spinlocks. Multiple cores can write into the queue at any given time, because its writes occur in the start_xmit path or in the udp_recv path. But reads happen in a single workqueue item per-peer, amounting to a multi-producer, single-consumer paradigm. The MPSC queue is implemented locklessly and never blocks. However, it is not linearizable (though it is serializable), with a very tight and unlikely race on writes, which, when hit (some tiny fraction of the 0.15% of partial adds on a fully loaded 16-core x86_64 system), causes the queue reader to terminate early. However, because every packet sent queues up the same workqueue item after it is fully added, the worker resumes again, and stopping early isn't actually a problem, since at that point the packet wouldn't have yet been added to the encryption queue. These properties allow us to avoid disabling interrupts or spinning. The design is based on Dmitry Vyukov's algorithm [1]. Performance-wise, ordinarily list-based queues aren't preferable to ringbuffers, because of cache misses when following pointers around. However, we *already* have to follow the adjacent pointers when working through fragments, so there shouldn't actually be any change there. A potential downside is that dequeueing is a bit more complicated, but the ptr_ring structure used prior had a spinlock when dequeueing, so all and all the difference appears to be a wash. Actually, from profiling, the biggest performance hit, by far, of this commit winds up being atomic_add_unless(count, 1, max) and atomic_ dec(count), which account for the majority of CPU time, according to perf. In that sense, the previous ring buffer was superior in that it could check if it was full by head==tail, which the list-based approach cannot do. But all and all, this enables us to get massive memory savings, allowing WireGuard to scale for real world deployments, without taking much of a performance hit. [1] http://www.1024cores.net/home/lock-free-algorithms/queues/intrusive-mpsc-node-based-queue Reviewed-by: Dmitry Vyukov <dvyukov@google.com> Reviewed-by: Toke Høiland-Jørgensen <toke@redhat.com> Fixes: e7096c131e51 ("net: WireGuard secure network tunnel") Signed-off-by: Jason A. Donenfeld <Jason@zx2c4.com> Signed-off-by: Jakub Kicinski <kuba@kernel.org>
2021-02-23wireguard: device: do not generate ICMP for non-IP packetsJason A. Donenfeld1-3/+4
If skb->protocol doesn't match the actual skb->data header, it's probably not a good idea to pass it off to icmp{,v6}_ndo_send, which is expecting to reply to a valid IP packet. So this commit has that early mismatch case jump to a later error label. Fixes: e7096c131e51 ("net: WireGuard secure network tunnel") Signed-off-by: Jason A. Donenfeld <Jason@zx2c4.com> Signed-off-by: Jakub Kicinski <kuba@kernel.org>
2021-02-23wireguard: peer: put frequently used members above cache linesJason A. Donenfeld1-2/+2
The is_dead boolean is checked for every single packet, while the internal_id member is used basically only for pr_debug messages. So it makes sense to hoist up is_dead into some space formerly unused by a struct hole, while demoting internal_api to below the lowest struct cache line. Signed-off-by: Jason A. Donenfeld <Jason@zx2c4.com> Signed-off-by: Jakub Kicinski <kuba@kernel.org>
2021-02-23wireguard: socket: remove bogus __be32 annotationJann Horn1-2/+2
The endpoint->src_if4 has nothing to do with fixed-endian numbers; remove the bogus annotation. This was introduced in https://git.zx2c4.com/wireguard-monolithic-historical/commit?id=14e7d0a499a676ec55176c0de2f9fcbd34074a82 in the historical WireGuard repo because the old code used to zero-initialize multiple members as follows: endpoint->src4.s_addr = endpoint->src_if4 = fl.saddr = 0; Because fl.saddr is fixed-endian and an assignment returns a value with the type of its left operand, this meant that sparse detected an assignment between values of different endianness. Since then, this assignment was already split up into separate statements; just the cast survived. Signed-off-by: Jann Horn <jannh@google.com> Signed-off-by: Jason A. Donenfeld <Jason@zx2c4.com> Signed-off-by: Jakub Kicinski <kuba@kernel.org>
2021-02-23wireguard: avoid double unlikely() notation when using IS_ERR()Antonio Quartulli2-3/+3
The definition of IS_ERR() already applies the unlikely() notation when checking the error status of the passed pointer. For this reason there is no need to have the same notation outside of IS_ERR() itself. Clean up code by removing redundant notation. Signed-off-by: Antonio Quartulli <a@unstable.cc> Signed-off-by: Jason A. Donenfeld <Jason@zx2c4.com> Signed-off-by: Jakub Kicinski <kuba@kernel.org>
2020-11-23lsm,selinux: pass flowi_common instead of flowi to the LSM hooksPaul Moore1-2/+2
As pointed out by Herbert in a recent related patch, the LSM hooks do not have the necessary address family information to use the flowi struct safely. As none of the LSMs currently use any of the protocol specific flowi information, replace the flowi pointers with pointers to the address family independent flowi_common struct. Reported-by: Herbert Xu <herbert@gondor.apana.org.au> Acked-by: James Morris <jamorris@linux.microsoft.com> Signed-off-by: Paul Moore <paul@paul-moore.com>
2020-11-09wireguard: switch to dev_get_tstats64Heiner Kallweit1-1/+1
Replace ip_tunnel_get_stats64() with the new identical core function dev_get_tstats64(). Reviewed-by: Jason A. Donenfeld <Jason@zx2c4.com> Signed-off-by: Heiner Kallweit <hkallweit1@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Jakub Kicinski <kuba@kernel.org>
2020-09-09wireguard: peerlookup: take lock before checking hash in replace operationJason A. Donenfeld1-3/+8
Eric's suggested fix for the previous commit's mentioned race condition was to simply take the table->lock in wg_index_hashtable_replace(). The table->lock of the hash table is supposed to protect the bucket heads, not the entires, but actually, since all the mutator functions are already taking it, it makes sense to take it too for the test to hlist_unhashed, as a defense in depth measure, so that it no longer races with deletions, regardless of what other locks are protecting individual entries. This is sensible from a performance perspective because, as Eric pointed out, the case of being unhashed is already the unlikely case, so this won't add common contention. And comparing instructions, this basically doesn't make much of a difference other than pushing and popping %r13, used by the new `bool ret`. More generally, I like the idea of locking consistency across table mutator functions, and this might let me rest slightly easier at night. Suggested-by: Eric Dumazet <edumazet@google.com> Link: https://lore.kernel.org/wireguard/20200908145911.4090480-1-edumazet@google.com/ Fixes: e7096c131e51 ("net: WireGuard secure network tunnel") Signed-off-by: Jason A. Donenfeld <Jason@zx2c4.com> Signed-off-by: David S. Miller <davem@davemloft.net>
2020-09-09wireguard: noise: take lock when removing handshake entry from tableJason A. Donenfeld1-4/+1
Eric reported that syzkaller found a race of this variety: CPU 1 CPU 2 -------------------------------------------|--------------------------------------- wg_index_hashtable_replace(old, ...) | if (hlist_unhashed(&old->index_hash)) | | wg_index_hashtable_remove(old) | hlist_del_init_rcu(&old->index_hash) | old->index_hash.pprev = NULL hlist_replace_rcu(&old->index_hash, ...) | *old->index_hash.pprev | Syzbot wasn't actually able to reproduce this more than once or create a reproducer, because the race window between checking "hlist_unhashed" and calling "hlist_replace_rcu" is just so small. Adding an mdelay(5) or similar there helps make this demonstrable using this simple script: #!/bin/bash set -ex trap 'kill $pid1; kill $pid2; ip link del wg0; ip link del wg1' EXIT ip link add wg0 type wireguard ip link add wg1 type wireguard wg set wg0 private-key <(wg genkey) listen-port 9999 wg set wg1 private-key <(wg genkey) peer $(wg show wg0 public-key) endpoint 127.0.0.1:9999 persistent-keepalive 1 wg set wg0 peer $(wg show wg1 public-key) ip link set wg0 up yes link set wg1 up | ip -force -batch - & pid1=$! yes link set wg1 down | ip -force -batch - & pid2=$! wait The fundumental underlying problem is that we permit calls to wg_index_ hashtable_remove(handshake.entry) without requiring the caller to take the handshake mutex that is intended to protect members of handshake during mutations. This is consistently the case with calls to wg_index_ hashtable_insert(handshake.entry) and wg_index_hashtable_replace( handshake.entry), but it's missing from a pertinent callsite of wg_ index_hashtable_remove(handshake.entry). So, this patch makes sure that mutex is taken. The original code was a little bit funky though, in the form of: remove(handshake.entry) lock(), memzero(handshake.some_members), unlock() remove(handshake.entry) The original intention of that double removal pattern outside the lock appears to be some attempt to prevent insertions that might happen while locks are dropped during expensive crypto operations, but actually, all callers of wg_index_hashtable_insert(handshake.entry) take the write lock and then explicitly check handshake.state, as they should, which the aforementioned memzero clears, which means an insertion should already be impossible. And regardless, the original intention was necessarily racy, since it wasn't guaranteed that something else would run after the unlock() instead of after the remove(). So, from a soundness perspective, it seems positive to remove what looks like a hack at best. The crash from both syzbot and from the script above is as follows: general protection fault, probably for non-canonical address 0xdffffc0000000000: 0000 [#1] PREEMPT SMP KASAN KASAN: null-ptr-deref in range [0x0000000000000000-0x0000000000000007] CPU: 0 PID: 7395 Comm: kworker/0:3 Not tainted 5.9.0-rc4-syzkaller #0 Hardware name: Google Google Compute Engine/Google Compute Engine, BIOS Google 01/01/2011 Workqueue: wg-kex-wg1 wg_packet_handshake_receive_worker RIP: 0010:hlist_replace_rcu include/linux/rculist.h:505 [inline] RIP: 0010:wg_index_hashtable_replace+0x176/0x330 drivers/net/wireguard/peerlookup.c:174 Code: 00 fc ff df 48 89 f9 48 c1 e9 03 80 3c 01 00 0f 85 44 01 00 00 48 b9 00 00 00 00 00 fc ff df 48 8b 45 10 48 89 c6 48 c1 ee 03 <80> 3c 0e 00 0f 85 06 01 00 00 48 85 d2 4c 89 28 74 47 e8 a3 4f b5 RSP: 0018:ffffc90006a97bf8 EFLAGS: 00010246 RAX: 0000000000000000 RBX: ffff888050ffc4f8 RCX: dffffc0000000000 RDX: 0000000000000000 RSI: 0000000000000000 RDI: ffff88808e04e010 RBP: ffff88808e04e000 R08: 0000000000000001 R09: ffff8880543d0000 R10: ffffed100a87a000 R11: 000000000000016e R12: ffff8880543d0000 R13: ffff88808e04e008 R14: ffff888050ffc508 R15: ffff888050ffc500 FS: 0000000000000000(0000) GS:ffff8880ae600000(0000) knlGS:0000000000000000 CS: 0010 DS: 0000 ES: 0000 CR0: 0000000080050033 CR2: 00000000f5505db0 CR3: 0000000097cf7000 CR4: 00000000001526f0 DR0: 0000000000000000 DR1: 0000000000000000 DR2: 0000000000000000 DR3: 0000000000000000 DR6: 00000000fffe0ff0 DR7: 0000000000000400 Call Trace: wg_noise_handshake_begin_session+0x752/0xc9a drivers/net/wireguard/noise.c:820 wg_receive_handshake_packet drivers/net/wireguard/receive.c:183 [inline] wg_packet_handshake_receive_worker+0x33b/0x730 drivers/net/wireguard/receive.c:220 process_one_work+0x94c/0x1670 kernel/workqueue.c:2269 worker_thread+0x64c/0x1120 kernel/workqueue.c:2415 kthread+0x3b5/0x4a0 kernel/kthread.c:292 ret_from_fork+0x1f/0x30 arch/x86/entry/entry_64.S:294 Reported-by: syzbot <syzkaller@googlegroups.com> Reported-by: Eric Dumazet <edumazet@google.com> Link: https://lore.kernel.org/wireguard/20200908145911.4090480-1-edumazet@google.com/ Fixes: e7096c131e51 ("net: WireGuard secure network tunnel") Signed-off-by: Jason A. Donenfeld <Jason@zx2c4.com> Signed-off-by: David S. Miller <davem@davemloft.net>
2020-08-18netlink: consistently use NLA_POLICY_MIN_LEN()Johannes Berg1-2/+2
Change places that open-code NLA_POLICY_MIN_LEN() to use the macro instead, giving us flexibility in how we handle the details of the macro. Signed-off-by: Johannes Berg <johannes.berg@intel.com> Signed-off-by: David S. Miller <davem@davemloft.net>
2020-08-18netlink: consistently use NLA_POLICY_EXACT_LEN()Johannes Berg1-5/+5
Change places that open-code NLA_POLICY_EXACT_LEN() to use the macro instead, giving us flexibility in how we handle the details of the macro. Signed-off-by: Johannes Berg <johannes.berg@intel.com> Acked-by: Matthieu Baerts <matthieu.baerts@tessares.net> Signed-off-by: David S. Miller <davem@davemloft.net>
2020-08-07mm, treewide: rename kzfree() to kfree_sensitive()Waiman Long2-3/+3
As said by Linus: A symmetric naming is only helpful if it implies symmetries in use. Otherwise it's actively misleading. In "kzalloc()", the z is meaningful and an important part of what the caller wants. In "kzfree()", the z is actively detrimental, because maybe in the future we really _might_ want to use that "memfill(0xdeadbeef)" or something. The "zero" part of the interface isn't even _relevant_. The main reason that kzfree() exists is to clear sensitive information that should not be leaked to other future users of the same memory objects. Rename kzfree() to kfree_sensitive() to follow the example of the recently added kvfree_sensitive() and make the intention of the API more explicit. In addition, memzero_explicit() is used to clear the memory to make sure that it won't get optimized away by the compiler. The renaming is done by using the command sequence: git grep -w --name-only kzfree |\ xargs sed -i 's/kzfree/kfree_sensitive/' followed by some editing of the kfree_sensitive() kerneldoc and adding a kzfree backward compatibility macro in slab.h. [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fs/crypto/inline_crypt.c needs linux/slab.h] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix fs/crypto/inline_crypt.c some more] Suggested-by: Joe Perches <joe@perches.com> Signed-off-by: Waiman Long <longman@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Acked-by: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Acked-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com> Acked-by: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org> Cc: Jarkko Sakkinen <jarkko.sakkinen@linux.intel.com> Cc: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org> Cc: "Serge E. Hallyn" <serge@hallyn.com> Cc: Joe Perches <joe@perches.com> Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org> Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com> Cc: Dan Carpenter <dan.carpenter@oracle.com> Cc: "Jason A . Donenfeld" <Jason@zx2c4.com> Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20200616154311.12314-3-longman@redhat.com Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2020-06-30wireguard: queueing: make use of ip_tunnel_parse_protocolJason A. Donenfeld2-18/+3
Now that wg_examine_packet_protocol has been added for general consumption as ip_tunnel_parse_protocol, it's possible to remove wg_examine_packet_protocol and simply use the new ip_tunnel_parse_protocol function directly. Signed-off-by: Jason A. Donenfeld <Jason@zx2c4.com> Signed-off-by: David S. Miller <davem@davemloft.net>
2020-06-30wireguard: implement header_ops->parse_protocol for AF_PACKETJason A. Donenfeld1-0/+1
WireGuard uses skb->protocol to determine packet type, and bails out if it's not set or set to something it's not expecting. For AF_PACKET injection, we need to support its call chain of: packet_sendmsg -> packet_snd -> packet_parse_headers -> dev_parse_header_protocol -> parse_protocol Without a valid parse_protocol, this returns zero, and wireguard then rejects the skb. So, this wires up the ip_tunnel handler for layer 3 packets for that case. Reported-by: Hans Wippel <ndev@hwipl.net> Signed-off-by: Jason A. Donenfeld <Jason@zx2c4.com> Signed-off-by: David S. Miller <davem@davemloft.net>
2020-06-25wireguard: receive: account for napi_gro_receive never returning GRO_DROPJason A. Donenfeld1-8/+2
The napi_gro_receive function no longer returns GRO_DROP ever, making handling GRO_DROP dead code. This commit removes that dead code. Further, it's not even clear that device drivers have any business in taking action after passing off received packets; that's arguably out of their hands. Fixes: e7096c131e51 ("net: WireGuard secure network tunnel") Fixes: 6570bc79c0df ("net: core: use listified Rx for GRO_NORMAL in napi_gro_receive()") Signed-off-by: Jason A. Donenfeld <Jason@zx2c4.com> Signed-off-by: David S. Miller <davem@davemloft.net>
2020-06-23wireguard: device: avoid circular netns referencesJason A. Donenfeld4-45/+55
Before, we took a reference to the creating netns if the new netns was different. This caused issues with circular references, with two wireguard interfaces swapping namespaces. The solution is to rather not take any extra references at all, but instead simply invalidate the creating netns pointer when that netns is deleted. In order to prevent this from happening again, this commit improves the rough object leak tracking by allowing it to account for created and destroyed interfaces, aside from just peers and keys. That then makes it possible to check for the object leak when having two interfaces take a reference to each others' namespaces. Fixes: e7096c131e51 ("net: WireGuard secure network tunnel") Signed-off-by: Jason A. Donenfeld <Jason@zx2c4.com> Signed-off-by: David S. Miller <davem@davemloft.net>
2020-06-23wireguard: noise: do not assign initiation time in if conditionFrank Werner-Krippendorf1-2/+2
Fixes an error condition reported by checkpatch.pl which caused by assigning a variable in an if condition in wg_noise_handshake_consume_ initiation(). Signed-off-by: Frank Werner-Krippendorf <mail@hb9fxq.ch> Signed-off-by: Jason A. Donenfeld <Jason@zx2c4.com> Signed-off-by: David S. Miller <davem@davemloft.net>
2020-05-20wireguard: noise: separate receive counter from send counterJason A. Donenfeld5-53/+48
In "wireguard: queueing: preserve flow hash across packet scrubbing", we were required to slightly increase the size of the receive replay counter to something still fairly small, but an increase nonetheless. It turns out that we can recoup some of the additional memory overhead by splitting up the prior union type into two distinct types. Before, we used the same "noise_counter" union for both sending and receiving, with sending just using a simple atomic64_t, while receiving used the full replay counter checker. This meant that most of the memory being allocated for the sending counter was being wasted. Since the old "noise_counter" type increased in size in the prior commit, now is a good time to split up that union type into a distinct "noise_replay_ counter" for receiving and a boring atomic64_t for sending, each using neither more nor less memory than required. Also, since sometimes the replay counter is accessed without necessitating additional accesses to the bitmap, we can reduce cache misses by hoisting the always-necessary lock above the bitmap in the struct layout. We also change a "noise_replay_counter" stack allocation to kmalloc in a -DDEBUG selftest so that KASAN doesn't trigger a stack frame warning. All and all, removing a bit of abstraction in this commit makes the code simpler and smaller, in addition to the motivating memory usage recuperation. For example, passing around raw "noise_symmetric_key" structs is something that really only makes sense within noise.c, in the one place where the sending and receiving keys can safely be thought of as the same type of object; subsequent to that, it's important that we uniformly access these through keypair->{sending,receiving}, where their distinct roles are always made explicit. So this patch allows us to draw that distinction clearly as well. Fixes: e7096c131e51 ("net: WireGuard secure network tunnel") Signed-off-by: Jason A. Donenfeld <Jason@zx2c4.com> Signed-off-by: David S. Miller <davem@davemloft.net>
2020-05-20wireguard: queueing: preserve flow hash across packet scrubbingJason A. Donenfeld4-4/+17
It's important that we clear most header fields during encapsulation and decapsulation, because the packet is substantially changed, and we don't want any info leak or logic bug due to an accidental correlation. But, for encapsulation, it's wrong to clear skb->hash, since it's used by fq_codel and flow dissection in general. Without it, classification does not proceed as usual. This change might make it easier to estimate the number of innerflows by examining clustering of out of order packets, but this shouldn't open up anything that can't already be inferred otherwise (e.g. syn packet size inference), and fq_codel can be disabled anyway. Furthermore, it might be the case that the hash isn't used or queried at all until after wireguard transmits the encrypted UDP packet, which means skb->hash might still be zero at this point, and thus no hash taken over the inner packet data. In order to address this situation, we force a calculation of skb->hash before encrypting packet data. Of course this means that fq_codel might transmit packets slightly more out of order than usual. Toke did some testing on beefy machines with high quantities of parallel flows and found that increasing the reply-attack counter to 8192 takes care of the most pathological cases pretty well. Reported-by: Dave Taht <dave.taht@gmail.com> Reviewed-and-tested-by: Toke Høiland-Jørgensen <toke@toke.dk> Fixes: e7096c131e51 ("net: WireGuard secure network tunnel") Signed-off-by: Jason A. Donenfeld <Jason@zx2c4.com> Signed-off-by: David S. Miller <davem@davemloft.net>
2020-05-20wireguard: noise: read preshared key while taking lockJason A. Donenfeld1-1/+5
Prior we read the preshared key after dropping the handshake lock, which isn't an actual crypto issue if it races, but it's still not quite correct. So copy that part of the state into a temporary like we do with the rest of the handshake state variables. Then we can release the lock, operate on the temporary, and zero it out at the end of the function. In performance tests, the impact of this was entirely unnoticable, probably because those bytes are coming from the same cacheline as other things that are being copied out in the same manner. Reported-by: Matt Dunwoodie <ncon@noconroy.net> Fixes: e7096c131e51 ("net: WireGuard secure network tunnel") Signed-off-by: Jason A. Donenfeld <Jason@zx2c4.com> Signed-off-by: David S. Miller <davem@davemloft.net>
2020-05-06wireguard: send/receive: use explicit unlikely branch instead of implicit coalescingJason A. Donenfeld2-16/+12
It's very unlikely that send will become true. It's nearly always false between 0 and 120 seconds of a session, and in most cases becomes true only between 120 and 121 seconds before becoming false again. So, unlikely(send) is clearly the right option here. What happened before was that we had this complex boolean expression with multiple likely and unlikely clauses nested. Since this is evaluated left-to-right anyway, the whole thing got converted to unlikely. So, we can clean this up to better represent what's going on. The generated code is the same. Suggested-by: Sultan Alsawaf <sultan@kerneltoast.com> Signed-off-by: Jason A. Donenfeld <Jason@zx2c4.com> Signed-off-by: David S. Miller <davem@davemloft.net>
2020-05-06wireguard: selftests: initalize ipv6 members to NULL to squelch clang warningJason A. Donenfeld1-2/+2
Without setting these to NULL, clang complains in certain configurations that have CONFIG_IPV6=n: In file included from drivers/net/wireguard/ratelimiter.c:223: drivers/net/wireguard/selftest/ratelimiter.c:173:34: error: variable 'skb6' is uninitialized when used here [-Werror,-Wuninitialized] ret = timings_test(skb4, hdr4, skb6, hdr6, &test_count); ^~~~ drivers/net/wireguard/selftest/ratelimiter.c:123:29: note: initialize the variable 'skb6' to silence this warning struct sk_buff *skb4, *skb6; ^ = NULL drivers/net/wireguard/selftest/ratelimiter.c:173:40: error: variable 'hdr6' is uninitialized when used here [-Werror,-Wuninitialized] ret = timings_test(skb4, hdr4, skb6, hdr6, &test_count); ^~~~ drivers/net/wireguard/selftest/ratelimiter.c:125:22: note: initialize the variable 'hdr6' to silence this warning struct ipv6hdr *hdr6; ^ We silence this warning by setting the variables to NULL as the warning suggests. Reported-by: Arnd Bergmann <arnd@arndb.de> Signed-off-by: Jason A. Donenfeld <Jason@zx2c4.com> Signed-off-by: David S. Miller <davem@davemloft.net>
2020-05-06wireguard: send/receive: cond_resched() when processing worker ringbuffersJason A. Donenfeld2-0/+6
Users with pathological hardware reported CPU stalls on CONFIG_ PREEMPT_VOLUNTARY=y, because the ringbuffers would stay full, meaning these workers would never terminate. That turned out not to be okay on systems without forced preemption, which Sultan observed. This commit adds a cond_resched() to the bottom of each loop iteration, so that these workers don't hog the core. Note that we don't need this on the napi poll worker, since that terminates after its budget is expended. Suggested-by: Sultan Alsawaf <sultan@kerneltoast.com> Reported-by: Wang Jian <larkwang@gmail.com> Fixes: e7096c131e51 ("net: WireGuard secure network tunnel") Signed-off-by: Jason A. Donenfeld <Jason@zx2c4.com> Signed-off-by: David S. Miller <davem@davemloft.net>
2020-05-06wireguard: socket: remove errant restriction on looping to selfJason A. Donenfeld1-12/+0
It's already possible to create two different interfaces and loop packets between them. This has always been possible with tunnels in the kernel, and isn't specific to wireguard. Therefore, the networking stack already needs to deal with that. At the very least, the packet winds up exceeding the MTU and is discarded at that point. So, since this is already something that happens, there's no need to forbid the not very exceptional case of routing a packet back to the same interface; this loop is no different than others, and we shouldn't special case it, but rather rely on generic handling of loops in general. This also makes it easier to do interesting things with wireguard such as onion routing. At the same time, we add a selftest for this, ensuring that both onion routing works and infinite routing loops do not crash the kernel. We also add a test case for wireguard interfaces nesting packets and sending traffic between each other, as well as the loop in this case too. We make sure to send some throughput-heavy traffic for this use case, to stress out any possible recursion issues with the locks around workqueues. Fixes: e7096c131e51 ("net: WireGuard secure network tunnel") Signed-off-by: Jason A. Donenfeld <Jason@zx2c4.com> Signed-off-by: David S. Miller <davem@davemloft.net>